Identifying and Avoiding Parental Alienation.

Every seasoned district court judge and child custody lawyer has seen cases where a parent, during a custody case, attempts to alienate his son’s or her daughter’s love and affection for the other parent in order to win the custody case. A parent’s attempt to brainwash, manipulate, or control a child to diminish or destroy the child’s love and affection for the other parent is generally known as referred to as parental alienation.

Public School or Private School: Which Parent Has Authority to Decide?

A new school year will soon begin and some parents will be making decisions regarding which school their child should attend. Where a child attends school is an important decision that can impact the child’s overall development and well-being. Inevitably, parents will have disagreements over where their child should attend school. One parent may want the child enrolled in a small, religious-oriented private school while the other parent wants the child to attend public school. So, which parent has authority to choose where the child attends school?

What Are Grounds to Appeal a Trial Judge’s Decision?

A party in a family law case – be it a child custody case, child support case, alimony case, or equitable distribution case - who believes the trial judge’s decision was mistaken or unsupported by law, may appeal that decision to the North Carolina Court of Appeals. In North Carolina, trial judges are vested with wide discretion in making decisions in family law cases, including those that involve divorce, child custody, child support, post-separation support, alimony, attorney’s fees awards, and/or equitable distribution.

Failure to Pay Child Support: Collection and Enforcement Remedies.

There are many enforcement tools to help the parent who was ordered to receive child support but fails to receive such support from the other parent. Both the parent who is to receive child support and the parent who is ordered to pay child support should be aware of different enforcement mechanisms available. The parent receiving support, the obligee, needs to be aware of these remedies in order to collect past due child support. The parent who is ordered to pay child support, or the obligor, needs to be aware of the enforcement tools because failure to pay the support can have devastating, long-term effects on his or her financial and personal life.

Didn’t Sign a Prenup? A Postnuptial Agreement Might Be Right for You.

A prenuptial agreement (also known as a premarital agreement) is an agreement entered into between two parties who are planning to be married. In order to be legal and binding, a prenuptial agreement must be entered into and signed by both parties before the marriage. However, parties who are already married can take advantage of some of the benefits of a prenuptial agreement by entering into an agreement known as a “postnuptial agreement.”